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managerial job in the world, president of the united states, leader of the free world. my question was how does he do it? how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not the context of the decisions, that's interesting, too, but what is the leadership style? i looked around for books a serious sustained way. >> host: do you see this as a campaign document coming out very close to the elections? >> guest: they do like to time things when people are paying attention and most americans tune in to politics around election time. >> host: each one of the things the with surprise to readers use it twice in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discover
leaders are leading the reform process. united states is committed to protecting the space for civil society to operate and the critical role plays in transitioning democracy all over the world. with a greater emphasis on a broader range of u.s. power, president obama succeeded in laying a new foundation for leadership in the world. nowhere do you see this more clearly than the commitment to the area that you focus on for the remainder of my remarks, the development in poverty and prosperity. the presiden was unapologetic, putting to rest the old myth that development is near charity. rejecting the notion that they were condemned by the gains in human developments. as such, the national security strategy recognizes development in the moral, strategic, and economic imperatives. on that day he announced the new u.s. global development policy. the premise is on the conviction that the ultimate goal of foreign assistance and development is to create the conditions with the assistance are no longer needed. focusing on helping these broad base -- is broadbased economic growth, prioritizing
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
the united states six years atoka in my first i told the mexican people that it was possible to transform mexico. i say that we could turn it into a postal nation with a competitive economy and we could build a first site to with more opportunities for everyone. we have mexico in a safer nation with a strong will of dhaka. i can tell you today we have made great strides and help put mexico on the track to make these decisions a reality. i would like to share some reflections on health care we have a stronger nation. let me start by talking of the transformation of the mexican economy. as you know, we have to confront the global kinnock crisis in memory. mexico was particularly vulnerable because our ties to the american economy which was at the epicenter of the crisis years ago half to and we took the necessary measures to prevent this crisis from becoming a major catastrophe. in doing so we were guided with three basic. financial discipline, economic freedom and increased competitiveness in we stayed after the country. first mexico has strong economic fundamentals. many countries put in
for the country. against perceived internal and external dangerous forces. israel, united states, first at the regime. vicious than enough of that over the decades and afterward he went from credence to that notion, that paranoia. so the syrian population made this bargain with the regime that they would give freedoms in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the re
outgoing mexican president felipe calderon on his country's relations with the united states. >> president obama held a campaign rally in milwaukee over the weekend, one month before early voting begins in this battleground state of wisconsin. [cheers and applause] >> this was the president's first visit to the state since february. a recent quinnipiac university/new york times/cbs poll of likely voters in wisconsin found president obama leading mitt romney 51-45%. this is about half an hour. [cheers and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause] >> hello, wisconsin! [cheers and applause] oh! hi! you guys sound like you're fired up already! [cheers and applause] it is good to be back in milwaukee! [cheers and applause] first of all, it's good to be back because this is the closest i've been the home in a couple of months -- [cheers and applause] i was thinking about hopping on the freeway and just driving on down. you know, hour and a half, maybe a little shorter with a motorcade, you know? [laughter] i am also glad to be in milwaukee because before i came out here, i was able to have an
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
rising home prices. all these are more important to the united states than what's going on in europe. >> mark, how do you see it? you invested in europe these days or no? >> a little bit, maria. you know, i guess the thing i would say about europe and soon to watch on our shores is you're going to pay more and get less. i look forward to the dislocation between price and value. i think there are a few opportunities in europe selectively. a company we own called securitas, which is a man-guarded service. it trades for about 50 krona. we think it's worth 72. we get about a 6% dividend yield. there's an example where you can find opportunity. >> everybody's looking for yield in an environment where we can't find any. rick, what are you seeing there today? >> you had a great point. everybody's looking for yields, so everybody needs to take more risk. that's the plan. the problem is, when you take more risk to get more reward, you have more risk. you know, take the word austerity and throw it out. use the word reform. one guest just said central bankers are doing all the heavy lifting. be
. very clearly. we will wipe out israel. when the united states of america then we go after this sunday people, the christians to send you a message. you have to wake up many people think not in my backyard. if it is it is really is a year backyard. what is the connection between hezbollah and iran and venezuela? why do they work together and they fly a the slides from here to caracas? hatred of the shared values the american values of what you represent. this comes from our brand and will come to the shores of the united states. we will all remember the attack of 9/11. and to attack the towers of new york city, i can share with all due respect to our intelligence if al qaeda wanted to attack the towers but they chose to attack in the u.s. in washington d.c. to send a message. so for that i hope the united states whoever is elected will take a decision to stop the nuclear race today. something very interesting when you look at the arab leaders they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear so for that matter i think we would like to take action for the u.s. to sit idly by israel has to do i
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
they're policies are, look at the map. look at the map of the united states in terms of seas, prom mentors, harbors these, coast of the united states, the 13 colonies, was jam packed with great natural harbors. the whole coast of africa, thousands of miles, relatively few good harbors which hindered africa's development, but the east coast was packed with them, and the united states, the continental core of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the zone that was settled and waterways flowing in a convenient east-west fashion than the rest of the world's waterways combined. so i'm saying that americans -- we're important not only because of their ideas and their democracy but because of where we happen to live as well, and so that's why these things, like mountains matter. the himalayas matter. they have allowed india and china to develop into who completely disstink great world civilizations without having much to do with each other, through long periods of history. >> so let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly suitable geographical place with all th
american forces like we had not seen in years. one of the first mobilizations was our united states military. and they were called to serve bravely in remote corners of the global. 11 years later the mastermind of 9/11, osama bin laden, was taken down, and we now have an al qaeda that is severely diminished, and we are bringing our troops home from that part of the world. but, mr. president, for the troops when they come home, the fight is not over. there's another fight when they get back home to america. it's a different type of battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring.
trying to find solutions to the problems of the united states of america. if he loves the united states of america, he should be out on his hinny getting this stuff done instead of talking all over this television and running romney down. host: thanks for the call from dayton, tennessee. want to give you one more story on the day, this from "the washington post," for politicians privacy vanishes in the age of video technology. mitt romney's mistake in speaking bluntly at a may fundraiser was not only in the words he spoke but failing to anticipate the ears they might breach, and audience that looked like an exclusive group of republican donors this week multiflied thanks to the pervasiveness of video technology. they are already confiscating smart phones but they have been largely overmatched as time and again moments intended to be kept secret have turned up on the internet. there is a total collapse of the notion of private space that the republican strategist, and top advisor of senator john mccain's presidential campaign in 2008, increasingly, politicians who say one thing behind cl
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
with the united states. we are your number one exporter relation between colombia and the u.s. do you feel that the current administration is doing enough to encourage colombian trade? is there something more that can be done? what is your wish-list for your country related to the united states? >> but at least to have congress ratify the free-trade agreement with colombia, the free-trade agreement we negotiated and closed with the united states during the previous administration. liz: david has one more question. david, go ahead. david: it is related to the problems in mexico. as you know corruption is endemic in mexico. there is so much corruption that has gone on for so many decades in mexico. again a lot of businesses are reluctant to get in because of that. if you're going to clean up the drug problem in mexico as you did in colombia, you have to deal with corruption. particularly among the police who are supposed to go after the drug dealers, not work with the drug dealers. how do you deal with a corruption problem in a place like mexico? >> no, no. i can not speak about mexico. i ha
through small local banks or sometimes large local banks. what happens is people in the united states and europe who fund these things generally go through an intermediary so they give their money to institutions such as kiva, a famous one that you -- deutsche bank, citibank, the traditional wall street companies, dedicated microfinance funses such as blue orchard, the biggest one in the order, and then you have the foundations. so in d.c. we have two examples, such as the foundation u.s.a. and calvert foundation but there are whole hot of these institutions. you give your money to one of these intermediary asks they apparently invest this in the -- in your best interests and in the best interests of the poor by channeling this money to these small banks in developing countries that are going to do effective microfinance. that's the idea. that's the theory. >> well, this book has been promoted and my understanding is that members of the church congregations, people making responsible investments are flocking to this opportunity. tell us about some of the people providing the money. >>
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
deduction. coming up live from the concordia summit at the plaza hotel, first united states ambassador to iraq when iraq was finally liberated from saddam hussein, lot of businesses wanted to get in on that country to help rebuild it. what are the challenges? we know there were some problems. also, the u.s. ambassador to the united states coming up next. we will be back with more of "countdown to the closing bell." [ female announcer ] you want family dinner to be special. dad, we want pizza. you guys said tacos. [ female announcer ] it doesn't always work out that way. you know what? we're spending too much money on eating out anyway. honey, come look at this. [ female announcer ] my money map from wells fargo is a free online tool that helps you track your spending. so instead of having to deal with a tight budget, you could have a tighter family. ♪ wells fargo. together we'll go far. with the fidelity stock screener, you can try strategies from independent experts and see wh criteria they use. such as a 5% yield on dividend-paying stocks. then you can customize the strategies and
introduced that topic as a very essential topic of the foreign policy of the united states. it was not theory. it became a reality. and one by one the countries of derision which were not used to elections or not used to democratic governments for many years and decades suddenly one after the other started to become democratic governments. and, of course, after he left the presidency he didn't go home to write memoirs and maybe play some golf. he has a beautiful house, i enjoy to visit you. he decided to be, continue being a big player many -- in supporting the same principles, human rights and democracy. and we see president carter going from one country to another observing elections. he has the ability to have the possibility to talk in friendly, in a friendly way with different actors in the region. i have witnessed that. it could be that maybe some actors are antagonist to the united states. maybe some of the actors do have different views about how the world should function. or different cultures about what democracy is. but president carter has the talent, the ability, the wisdom to in
came across the plaza, senators and their staff streaming down the steps here, the united states senate, not knowing where to go. and that is one of the many frightening, very frightening things, not only did we not know what was happening but there was no place for these incredibly important people to go, no plan at the time. so we came right here, which is across from the capitol, we trd to plug in our camera so they could get a shot of whatever was going to happen or happening here and it was really that the moment, we're talking about minutes here, suzanne, that members of the capitol police corps started screaming, run, run for your life. i believe you were at the white house, to have somebody who is in uniform tell you to run for your life, there's probably nothing more frightening than that. and the reason is because they were hearing in their ear that a plane was missing in the air and of course it was 93 and they didn't know if it was heading for the white house or the capitol or what. so that's why they told us to leave. i want to show you the scene, people were running across
this country faces the starkest choice for president of the united states that has in that least my lifetime. that means in all of your lifetime. but for all the talk governor romney and congressman ryan have engaged in, they do not have the courage yet to tell you what their policies for this nation really are. it will shock you, i have the courage to tell you this morning with their policies are. [laughter] it's amazing if you listen to them. they talk so much about how they care about medicare. you would think it was a republican idea the way they talk about it. you think it was republicans supporting it. they talk about how they want to preserve it. they do it sincerely and talk about how they sincerely want to preserve and protect the benefits for all those people, guaranteeing all those people on medicare now, the 30 million seniors that nothing will change. if you listen to them these days, you would think that had been a republican plan all along. that's what they say and that is what they exude believe, and these are facts. they don't tell you that there fan with a meat -- their pla
. >> the united states condemns in the strongest determines this attack. we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attacked our people. >> obama said the attack will not break the bonds between the countries. the president of libya's national assembly apologized at a news conference in tripoli. mohammad garias acknowledged that film insulted the prophet muhammad. still, he said retaliatory attack cannot be tolerated. the film at the heart of the protests has angered people across the middle east. it depicts the prophet muhammad and includes scenes of sexuality. hundreds of egyptians protested for a second day in front of the u.s. embassy in cairo. authorities have sent in more security forces to watch them. >> translator: i'm deeply hurt, seeing the prophet insulted. the u.s. should give consideration to the sentiment of muslims. >> the protests spread to tunisia, jordan, and morocco. part of the film is now online. many muslims consider any depiction of the prophet muhammad offensive. >>> the wait is over for those queueing up to see the latest lineup of produc
and outside the united states are lining up with criticisms. so we are curious to see what kind of impact qe 3 will bring to the economy. >> policy makers at the fed are looking down the road. they released their outlook on u.s. economic growth for the next 3 years. central banked lowered its betw. from 1.9 and 2.4% projected in june. members of the federal open market committee expect the economy will pick up in the coming years. they project growth to reach between 3% and 3.8% in 2015. the fed kept its forecast on unemployment unchanged at between 8% and 8.2% over the last quarter. committee members expect joblessness to ease. they expect it to fall to between 6% and 6.8% in 2015. >>> japanese government analysts chartered what its ahead of their economy. they downgraded their assessment for a second straight month. the governmentnom -- economic recovery has taken a pause downgraded from august. that something jessed the economy was moderately recovering even through some weaknesses. the first time the government has issued two straight downgrades since it lowered assessments for five straig
. >> this is offshore buoy much like we use here in the united states off the coast of dell wear and new jersey? >> that's it exactly. >> you have partnered with british petroleum. they will start delivering lng, is that correct? >> that is not done yet. one we're doing is accelerate energy. an american company. that we like and trust. and hopefully they will be our partner in exporting, or i am porting the -- importing the natural gas. >> i'm an investor in the united states programs i could take a stake or investment in accelerator. >> that is great idea. >> what other opportunity because israel natural gas is a state-owned company. how might i get in on what you're building next three or four years to become a natural gas exporter? how can an investor here take part in that? what companies are you working here in the states to work with that infrastructure? >> you can invest basically, although we're fully owned by government we issued bonds, we are rated aa-plus and by moody's and s&p. you could invest with the company but more likely that you would like to invest with the partners around us from th
of the united states. what exactly do you mean? >> well, jim, first of all, i would like to thank the sponsors of this debate and the people of boston for hosting the debate. i would like to thank governor bush for participating, and i would like to say i'm happy to be here with tipper and our family. i have actually not questioned governor bush's experience. i have questioned his proposals. and here is why. i think this is a very important moment for our country. we have achieved extraordinary prosperity. and in this election, america has to make an important choice. will we use our prosperity to enrich not just the few, but all of our families? i believe we have to make the right and responsible choices. if i'm entrusted with the presidency, here are the choices that i will make. i will balance the budget every year. i will pay down the national debt. i will put medicare and social security in a lockbox and protect them. and i will cut taxes for middle- class families. i believe it's important to resist the temptation to squander our surplus. if we make the right choices, we can have a prosp
graduates in the united states right now who are basically indentured servants because they have these brutal unforgiving loans and they don't have jobs to be able to pay them back because wages are declining, we have high entrenched unemployment, and the jobs that are coming back are low wage, insecure, poor benefit jobs. so if you took student loans -- students, who are very good at communicating on the internet, if they decided they were going to create a peaceful revolution in the ballot box, they could do so because our campaign is the one solution that's will to, number one, forgive student debt, instead of bailing out the banks again for another trillion dollars, which is what the latest quantitative easing is going to do, we could -- we could be bailing out the students with the quantitative easing, buying up the bad debt in the student securities, the student loan securities, and essentially wiping out student debt because public higher education is a public good, we provided public education through high school degree, throughout the 20th century, but in the 21st centur
. that's important. because that distinguishes him from the united states senate which also has a legal obligation to submit a budget and has refused to do so for the last three years. you wonder why it is we can't come together on funding priorities, madam speaker, three years the senate has said we are not going to tell you what we are interested in doing. we are not going to provide you with any ideas. and because we won't move it, the house product can't move, the president doesn't have anything to work with, and you see the kind of economic turmoil that we are in today. but the president to his credit has submitted a budget each and every year with his priorities. this is the budget he submitted for 2012. this was just last february, the law required it. he complied with it. but he's running for re-election and he's got his fingers on the pulse of the american people, but what they need and what they desire and what they want from the united states government, all tuned towards an election in november anti-budget that he submitted -- and the budget that he submitted raidses taxes a
, or is this something much deeper, a long simmering distrust of the united states? >> it's all the above. it's much long-simmering resentment of the united states. it has some legitimate reasons, but it's essentially a pretext, and it is not really about religion. it's about politics and world power. it's about what's taking place in these countries that are going through a tremendous complex, painful transition. take egypt, for instance, extremists and islamists with different interpretations of islam competing with the mainstream islamist group in egypt which is the muslim brotherhood. >> right. >> they whipped up frenzy against the movie initially, and then the president, who is very cynical, was looking to protect his flanks so he called for more monstrations instead of containing the demonstrations or condemning them so what you have is a competition in egypt as to who is going to shape the future of egypt, and using this movie as a pretext. >> which raised the question. is this about the united states really a all, or is this about uncertainty in these people's own futures and their religious lead
surveillance in the united states. after their two weeks of work, lawmakers will likely only finish government spending, maybe disaster aid or benefits for needy families. it is very unlikely congress resolves anything on taxes, fiscal cliff, post office reform, or the farm bill. and a top house republican blames it on the senate and says it is all democrats. >> the u.s. congress has been working quite a bit. it's the u.s. senate that's been stopping everything. so we don't know how much comes to fruition, but we do know we will get things through the house, but when it gets to the senate -- [inaudible]. rich: democrats say it is the republicans fault. in an op-ed in politico, it says since president obama took office republicans have done little but obstruct and delay. democrats have offered their plans. republicans theirs. neither sees the political benefit of negotiating any of this until they know who wins in november. connell: rich, thank you. rich edson in d.c. for more, let's bring douglas holtz-eakin in, former cbo director, also in washington. it's almost a joke to us after a while, t
opposition. overseas president obama restored the reputation of the united states within the community. dialling a and collaboration are once again possible with the return of spirit and trust and good will to our foreign policy. of course, there remains much to do. communities across america and countries around the world, life is too hard for too many people. we see their struggle and also our hearts go out to them. in the coming years our hands must continue to reach out to them. after all that remains to be done and at home and abroad, the evidence is overwhelming. president obama is a leader for america and we faison slaught of some of the most complicated and international challenges to confront any u.s. president in modern times. it is up to all of us to make sure that the american people understand exactly what is at stake. and at risk in this election. with president obama in oval office we can make good progress towards becoming a fairer, stronger, more prosperous america. and a nation adjusted to changing and challenging times, hold it true to unchanging principles. a leader
announcing in the quietest most resurgent way possible that i'm grateful to live in the united states of america. that's all. gratitude for the sacrifices of my forebears. gratitude for the opportunity this country a force. gratitude for the men and women who served to fight in the military probably. gratitude for being a part of this amazing, ennobling experience representative democracy. blood, liberals hate the americans event is just okay. not good, not great. serving unexceptional. just okay. conservative women, mouthy ladies. to see some truly a lover i want, in your next conversation with a liberal, i was thinking about something sarah palin said the other day. stanback. led to the huffing and puffing and sighing and moaning begin to get as much as you finish the set by the way. you could say sarah palin likes chocolate ice cream or sarah palin thanks panda bears are cuddly. the result is going to be a kind of deranged automatic rejection of anything sarah palin says or thinks. try with ann coulter. same reaction. actually try with any well-known female who is unapologetically
nomination for president of the united states. [ cheering and applause ] >> in address the president finished by telling americans they are the hope and the change in this election. he will be back on the campaign trail today last night's speech characterized the republican plan to rollback regulations and to cut taxes -- he cautioned some in his party to not depend on government to solve every problem and republicans who blame government as the major cause for the country's troubles. >> the president: we draw strength from our victories and we learn from our mistakes, but we keep our eye fixed on that distant horizon knowing providence is and that we are blessed to be citizens of the greatest nation on earth! [ cheering and applause ] >> democrats hope the president's message will resonate with voters knowing they most likely will not get much of a convention bounce in the tight race especially after the jobs numbers this morning. >>> he gave us a lot of hope that it is we the people who have brought us this far. >> he was the president of the united states speaking with the passion from his
and the united states. work with those people and have the keystone pipeline and, but, the missing link, in this whole thing is that we've never had an energy plan in america. melissa: you are right about that. >> we have no energy plan. melissa: you're right about all that. that is great setup because we have the ceo transcanada coming up. boone pickens thanks for coming on the show tonight. we really appreciate your time. >> sure. melissa: transcanada submit as new route for the keystone xl pipeline. can the plan avoid getting quashed by the white house? boone talked about how much we need this. i will ask transcanada's ceo in a first on fox interview coming up next. >>> plus, ecb mario draghi sends bulls on a tear. look at that. is his debt crisis fix a short term high for investors? piles of money printed by the e.u. coming up. ♪ . [ thunder crashes ] [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit fl
, ceo and cofounder. we always love when people come back to the united states. so far you have just begun the process. talk about you do and why you chose china as a place to do it. you do led lighting. how long were you in china and why did you choose to go there originally? >> well, first of all, thanks for having me, dave, liz. we chose to go to china, we first opened in 2007 in china. we did a lot of engineering stuff over there because the costs were obviously a lot cheaper. and really what we concentrated on in 2000 was expanding there quite a bit. since, since 2009 we've really, we've really looked at our costs and even though it is a lot cheaper for to us manufacture products in china we've done the proper social thing about bringing businesses back to the u.s.. david: so tell us, first of all exactly how much of a loss, i mean, essentially you are going to be paying more by higher labor costs, will you not, coming into the united states? >> yeah, we're paying more but you know, there is field expenses too have that gone up which makes china knot appealing to us and also the
clock on the convention floor. this is why. the united states pushing that 16 trillion mark yesterday. what does that mean for a president who wants a second term. we'll discuss and dismiss the debt like they do. chris christy said what is wrong with washington? well nancy pelosi. >> she is part of the problem. it is true. listen, any of the leaders are up there if they are not trying to make a difference. >> brian: chris christy sounded off and sang a bit with jimmie fallon. we'll bring it out because you were probably nodding off when he was talking to chris christie. all next for the 2012 election . ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> >> gretchen: good morning. i needed that election surge to get me through hump day. i needed that election. thank you for making my day. >> brian: we are wednesday and two more days left of the convention and we'll know here until friday morning. yesterday it was clear, we need more time and we are off to a great start and need more time. >> steve: plus we might need more umbrellas. supper time, it was coming down. >> brian: i didn't notice that. >> gretche
follow that up. the israeli government, the prime minister, at least, has challenged the united states to define a red line or else is would be able to act on its own without clearing anything with the united states. this sounds to me like an ultimatum. is that what it was? was a governnt of israel giving us an ultimatum? was that wise? >> look, israel was in my portfolio. i have traveled there 13 times. i have had hundreds of meetings with israeli officials. we are in lock step with them on how far iran is toward getting a nuclear weapon capability. we are in step with them on the objective of preventing iran from getting a nuclear weapon. they do not have the same military capability of the united states has. they do not believe they can wait as long as we can. we need to work together to align our clocks. president netanyahu is expressing concerns. the president shares those concerns. it is a huge threat to israel and the interest of the united states. this president has made clear that all options will be considered to address that. the current israeli government would like the u.s
of the united states. it is a job that brings with it a lot of speaking responsibilities and oh, my god, could you see that tonight. first lady tonight, a long, personal, emotionally, frankly excellent speech from michelle obama. chris matthews? >> certainly made the connection, don't you think? i mean, so much of tonight was interactive. it was between her and that audience in the room. i thought the camera work was so important watching this on television. you saw on the faces of men and women, black and white, all different backgrounds, the connection. she was with people. the emotional connection, telling the story of her love affair with her husband. with her life of getting ahead. but there was one big difference than four years ago which just came through in the earlier speeches tonight. it was hope and change, yes, hope and change but not hope and change imaginally overnight. but hope through work and patience and time and effort and then change. i think it was a much more mature look at their own lives as they got there. i'll tell you, i assume most americans watching tonight who have
for the united states. >> allowing our own congress to check our moves. >> i'm not going to play ken rogoff in chess. ken is exactly right. this is actually washington. this is the nature of our political system. they always put off the tough decisions till the last minute. a little point of optimism. this week, the house senate, democrats and republicans, had a hearing on what to do about this tax system that ken and i have so much about that's an abomination, that's an albatross around the neck of the politicians. they said, next year, we've got to do this. and i think 2013 -- hold me to this promise -- i think next year, they do something really big on fixing the tax system. they have to deal with the amt, the estate tax, the tax cliff that's coming, all these things come to a fore in 2013. gets to the point, when will they fix it? when they're right up against the abyss? >> i think if there's a fairly decisive election result, the democrats win across the board or the republicans win across the board, yes. i'm not so sure. i'm just not so sure what they're going to do if we get stuck in
put an all-in with regard to quantitativizing in the united states. you don't fight the bang of england, the bank of japan, people's bank of china, the ecb and the fed. this ends up being good for risk assets over the next 6 to 12 months. we've added stocks to european equity, looking at emerging markets again which has lagged. ironically specifically in asia, in a follow-up to the chinese context right now. but there is a lot of opportunity right now. >> what about china? michelle set up some of the diplomatic tiffs going on between china and japan. if you look at china's economy, a lot of people have written china off in terms of its investment potential near-term. doesn't sound like you were doing that. >> i think people are overembellishing the downside. valuation show we're at significant discounts but in a very nacent domestic value. we're missing point with regard to 7% 208% growth is still very dynamic in china. they have beter response to the global markets. i think the reality to china is we don't want continued expectation of 10% growth. we want 7% growth domestic
. as you mentioned, unemployment came close to 10% like europe and the united states, but in 2010, 2011, 2012, the economy's going again, i think the strongest economic growth in the western world. also this year. unemployment is down -- [inaudible] than any other western country, and this is due to the fact that the level of investment in the real economy grew by 40% in the last three years. >> reporter: what is it, dueck, that attract -- do you think, that attracts foreign investors to israel? when i've listened to some of the speakers today, they tab being a country that is on par with all the western democracies and economies, and can yet you're surrounded by neighbors who are hostile, you're in a very rough neighborhood. >> yeah. >> reporter: why is it that investors don't seem to be afraid of the neighbors? >> i opened my speech today exactly with this question, and i say people can find many reasons not to invest in israel, little country, little market, difficult geopolitics situation sitting in the middle of the middle east. and still you can find most of the big companies in t
for a urnaround and the man for that turnaround will be our next presiient of the united states and his name is mitt romney." the obama campaign says, yes....the nation is in a "betttr position" than it was 4 years ago..bama's senioo campaign adviser told fox news sunday... americans recognize phh financial crisis erupttd tte year before presiient obama took office. jury deliberations continue in towson town centerered teen at - centerfrank williams and william warr face handgun... conspiracc... and first degree murder charggs. williims is allegedly thh one whh put the hit on 19- ward is accused of being part offa gang and overseeing the murder.llst week prosecutors presented video surveilllnne of the tto before tte shooting.mooentsá 7 people are injuree... after their boat hits a large wake in missouri. incident was caught on camera. but before we how you this video... we want to here shifting back and forth as the boat begins to shake. seconds later... rough &pwaters causes the captain o lose contrrl... knockingg everyone off tteir feet.some people even hit their heads 5 of the boater
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